Ahab Mueller Continues to Chase President Trump

I frankly don’t know how President Trump gets anything accomplished in the White House. What with the noise created by dominoes falling and the screeching of walls closing in due to Ahab Mueller’s investigation, it must be impossible to hear yourself think.

Gary McCoy, Shiloh, IL

On the plus side, the background din does make it that much harder for disgruntled employees to surreptitiously record the president’s conversations.

Now that former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen pled guilty, it’s time for Ahab Mueller and his angry Democrats to quit shilly–shallying and get to the campaign finance scandal hiding in plain sight: Barron Trump’s allowance.

Stormy Daniels ragging on Trump during his campaign is just another estrogen attack like Rosie O’Donnell or Megyn Kelly. Trump and female entertainers, with or without their clothes on, are a volatile mix.

Barron is a different story. Say he’s unhappy with the size of his allowance compared to that of other plutocrat progeny. In an interview with the school newspaper Barron calls his father a skinflint and hints that he might not be a billionaire. Tiger Beat picks up the story and the next thing you know George Ramos is shouting questions.

It’s possible Trump isn’t as wealthy as he claims. That’s why the only way the public would get access to Trump’s tax returns is if Anderson Cooper pried the documents from his cold, dead hands. I think that’s also why Trump abandoned one of his early selling points and didn’t finance his own campaign.

If Barron had even intimated he thought dad had small hands and a smaller bank account it would have been headline news. Keeping that negative publicity squashed would have been invaluable to Trump’s campaign.

That’s why it’s time for Mueller to bait another hook. First, Ahab needs to learn if Barron’s allowance experienced a suspiciously large increase just after his father announced. Then, who handled the money? Did Trump distribute the payoff or did he use a cutout like Melania? Or a check drawn on a Russian bank?

Everyone knows how volatile kids can be. Did Trump have to ‘sweeten the pot’ as the campaign intensified to ensure continued silence?

You may be skeptical. Thinking even the insane clown posse that constitutes the US left would hesitate to weaponize an allowance, but you’d be wrong.

Look at the “campaign law violations” to which Cohen pled guilty. In this instance Mueller manufactured his own whale and claimed a catch. The twisted logic behind the “violation” is twofold. Cohen made an illegal campaign contribution when he paid Stormy Daniels using his own money, then Trump reimbursed him. And two, the expenditure was not accurately reported on the campaign reports filed with the FEC.

Let’s take these fantasies one at a time. Trump is allowed to spend unlimited amounts of his money on his campaign. If Cohen is guilty of a contribution violation because he paid a whore for not performing, then EVERY campaign vendor from ad agencies, to printers, to pollsters are also guilty of campaign contribution violations if they bought media, printed literature or surveyed voters before being paid by the campaign.

By this illogic, any vendor who has an outstanding invoice— woe unto you if it’s the Clinton campaign — is also guilty of an expenditure violation or an unreported loan.

Which brings us to the other violation. There’s a blank on the form where the campaign explains for what the money was spent. I’ve seen ‘consulting,’ ‘media’ and ‘campaign services’ plenty of times, but never ‘hush money to a ‘ho.’ If Trump reimbursed Cohen and the expenditure was listed as ‘consulting’ and not ‘consorting’ then we are in the realm of definitions.

At worst it’s a labeling offense and no jury would convict and no prosecutor, other than one on a whale hunt, would bring charges. Fined, yes. Jail, no.

I’m in agreement with Mark Penn, formerly a consultant for the Clintons, “Paying for nondisclosure agreements for perfectly legal activities is not a crime, not a campaign contribution as commonly understood or ruled upon by the Federal Election Commission.”

Ahab Mueller had Cohen hanging from a yardarm. The bank fraud and tax charges were real and carry significant jail time. The deal was Cohen pleads guilty to actions that weren’t crimes to damage Trump in order to get leniency from Mueller on the real crimes.

As Penn points out, “[Cohen] is pleading guilty over a corporate contribution he did not make.” The one he did make was a personal expenditure that if Trump had used campaign funds to pay, he would have been guilty of committing a crime.

Investigating Barron’s allowance is no more ridiculous than indicting for convincing a ‘ho to sign a non–disclosure agreement. The Mueller gang isn’t conducting an investigation, it’s conducting a slow–motion coup.

Advertisements

Where is the GOP Refund Window?

Scott Daugherty of the Virginian–Pilot has discovered a lawsuit that may make a conservative folk hero out of the lawyer/plaintiff.

Bob Heghmann, a 70–year–old retired lawyer who lives in Virginia Beach, VA, has filed a lawsuit in federal court charging the national and Virginia Republican parties with more than simple bad faith failure to repeal Obamacare, as Republicans had promised voters for over seven years.

His lawsuit contends Republicans “[have] been engaged in a pattern of Racketeering which involves massive fraud perpetrated on Republican voters and contributors as well as some Independents and Democrats.” Heghmann believes the parties and national GOP leaders raised millions of dollars in campaign funds from trusting voters “while knowing they weren’t going to be able to overturn…Obamacare.”

As far as Heghmann is concerned that’s prima facie racketeering.

Morton Blackwell, a Virginia GOP national committee member named in the lawsuit, issued a two–edged response to the filing. Blackwell began by denigrating Heghmann’s call for legal accountability. He described the case as a “frivolous, nuisance suit that should be thrown out of court by any judge.”

Then he followed up with a statement that sounds more like an amicus brief than a condemnation. “[Blackwell] argued that ‘progressives’ had taken over the Democratic Party and seemed to lament that ‘conservatives’ had not yet taken over the Republican Party.”

Heghmann struck while the outrage was hot, filing just a week after Curator of the Senate Mitch McConnell failed to pass an Obamacare repeal–only bill. It’s Heghmann’s belief Republican fund–raising should be just as accountable to donors as any other commercial money raising effort.

If Jim Bakker can go to jail for failing to honor pie–in–the–sky promises, why shouldn’t Republican committees be penalized for failing to honor pie–in–Obama’s–face promises?

Heghmann says, “Republicans could have repealed and replaced Obamacare with two–page bill. But the leadership never intended to do it. They want government control of healthcare, because as far as Republicans and Democrats are concerned it’s their way of balancing the books.”

It’s Heghmann’s belief he can strike a blow for an outraged conservative base because he’s been a contributor, although not to the Virginia GOP or the RNC. The dangerous section of his suit is where he demands the political arms refund donor’s money if Obamacare isn’t repealed.

By his calculations the RNC raised more than $735 million and Virginia Republicans took more than $20 million to the bank between 2009 and 2016 using the repeal of Obamacare as leverage to open wallets around the country.

If a promoter raised almost a billion dollars and promised to build a an energy plant and then didn’t even break ground, he would be guilty of fraud in spite of the fact he’s also probably a green energy advocate.

So why shouldn’t politicians who promise much and deliver nothing be held accountable, too?

That’s easy, just like DC politicians exempted themselves from Obamacare, they also made sure they’re not legally actionable for lying to the public. However, that exemption doesn’t apply to the state and national committees and that’s where Heghmann gets his leverage.

His first hurdle is surviving an expected motion to dismiss the lawsuit. If Heghmann makes it past that milestone, he has some interesting requests for the judge. He wants to limit the jury pool to Republicans who are both registered and voted and are aware of national issues. His contention is a jury of his peers in this instance is an informed and voting jury.

 

 

His goal is not really to obtain refunds, “I don’t want to bankrupt GOP, I want GOP to do what it promised to do.” Heghmann explains, “Money is leverage to get them to do what they are supposed to do.”

Mostly Heghmann is a “full supporter” of Trump who is fed up.

As far as he’s concerned, “Establishment Republicans have in effect repudiated the results of the last election. In their view the people made a mistake when they elected Donald Trump and the establishment is as interested in seeing Trump fail as Democrats are.”

Heghmann just wants the GOP to “support Trump’s agenda.” He has a better chance of getting the money.

You can follow Heghmann’s lead without going to court. Simply attend the next town hall meeting of your GOP Senator or Congressman and demand a campaign contribution refund due to failure to perform.

Should you know other contributors, stand up together and demand refunds in unison. If your politician is too gutless to won’t hold a real town hall meeting, then hold a refund news conference outside his district office when he’s back home.

I doubt you’ll get your money back in either event, but the embarrassment and bad publicity generated for the Obamacare betrayers will be priceless.

Donald Trump: For Rent

Donald Trump has upended presidential campaign conventional wisdom yet again. It was traditional for candidates in former years to wait until after inauguration to break campaign promises. Trump doesn’t even wait until he’s the nominee.

Trump Support Build WallBefore last week’s startling announcement two of Trump’s biggest applause lines were “I’m self–funding my campaign” and “go ahead and kick that demonstrator’s a**.”

Going into as much detail as he ever goes into, Trump would explain, “By self-funding my campaign, I am not controlled by my donors, special interests or lobbyists. I am only working for the people of the U.S.!”

And the people — at least those who made it inside the venue and spoke English — loved it! He’s not PC and he’s building the wall! Trump is his own man. He can’t be bought or bribed.

Trump’s independence gave him credibility. Juan Bush bragging about his fund–raising total may have impressed professional politicians, but it told average Americans that he was more promiscuous than the rest of the field.

When people are tired of bought–and–paid for politicians, proclaiming yourself the biggest sellout of all is hardly a vote getter.

Money is the mother’s milk of politics and the man who brings his own cow is his own man.

As long as Trump could get by on the cheap, much like the interior decoration in his casinos, self–funding was okay. He limited his spending to a mere $40 million during the primary because the news media, his private superPAC, helped him dominate primary coverage.

Michael Bloomberg — another rich guy, but lacking a personality — had to spend more of his fortune to become mayor of New York than Trump did to win the GOP presidential nomination in a nationwide campaign.

Now Trump has made what Deon Sanders used to call a business decision. He knows his media superPAC will be all Hillary all the time in the fall and it will take real money to replace that free coverage. He’s concluded it’s too expensive to be un–bought and anti–establishment in the general election. Now he’s listing himself on Craigslist under the headline: Anti–Establishment Insurgent for Rent.

This is extraordinary. Trump’s absorbing the Republican National Committee’s fundraising apparatus and soliciting big–money donations repudiates half of his most effective message to voters. Trump’s explanation when asked about the about–face was he could sell a building and finance his campaign, but why bother?

After all, self–funding was only a promise to the people who choose Trump to be their nominee. It’s not like he signed a contract. If Trump is questioned regarding this slap–in–the–face to Main Street American’s who sent money, attended rallies and voted for him, no doubt his answer will be a variation on “Who are you going to believe? Me or your lying ears?”

Even MSNBC, hardly a fan of Trump or the GOP, thinks this turnabout is a huge mistake: “Trump is taking one of the best arguments in support of his candidacy and throwing it out the window…Trump has argued, ad nauseam, that campaign contributions have a corrupting effect on public officials. Politicians can be bought, the argument goes, and Trump knows because he’s done the buying.”

And now it appears Trump is at least for rent.

There are two ways to look at Trump’s decision. One, he’s not as rich as he claims — possibly explaining why Trump won’t release tax returns either — and he doesn’t have the money to run a general election campaign. Or two, he believes his own hype. Trump thinks he can do or say almost anything and his base will still support him.

Trump’s pump–priming made his candidacy possible. Can you picture him raising a dime from the usual suspects in May of 2015? By self–financing he turned lemons into lemonade and began a movement. Now he’s tinkling in the lemonade.

The truth is Trump — the man who listens to the Americans the elites ignore — is just as ready to tune them out as Democrats and Establishment Republicans when he finds it convenient. You might say during the primary Trump self–funded and during the general election he self–destructed.